Lord Dickhead's Dilemma

Lord Devlin's Dilemma (Zebra Regency Romance) - Olivia Sumner

Well, it flowed well, so I'll give it a half. I guess it's supposed to be regency but if they'd left out the H's connections, it could have been any time period, mostly because it largely took place in a moldering pile, well, except for the wild goose chases.

 

So Charles Worthington (think that was his last name), Lord Devlin, who from this point forward shall be referred to as Lord Dickhead...:) on a mission to the crown (and here I must ponder why all these heirs were off doing stuff for the crown and risking their titles going to distant relatives they'd never heard of), contrives to a) have a carriage "breakdown" near Lyon Hall - the h's abode (more on that later) b) impose himself upon her for lodging, etc., while waiting for the right moment to snatch a moldering old cloak that supposedly belonged to a king 150 years previous and possibly has more code to locate missing loose crown jewels. He essentially spends most of the book lying through his teeth, spouting disinformation, and obsessing over the thing. He finally comes to his senses in the last chapter or so.

 

Jane Sterling, American who finds herself the proud owner of the moldering pile and the cloak of distraction, is no fool, and notices his interest the first night. She has several spare cloaks that look enough like it that she swaps one out after lights out. He falls for the bait, and is very defensive at being called a liar (though perhaps she should have also called him thief too). Meanwhile, the real thing has been given to charity - intentionally, to see his reaction. He disappoints. There were a couple of times he came to her defense. But mostly seemed to obsessed with the damned cloak that he barely noticed she existed. And somehow, she falls for him. No idea why since he didn't even bother to whip out the magic pen.

 

He does finally start getting a clue in the last chapter - apparently her barbs did eventually sink through that thick skull.

 

How is it that the h inherited this estate? I was under the impression that women having the right to own land was a more recent development.